Computers are very simple you see we take the hearts of dead stars and we flatten them into crystal…

serena-darrin:

asteroidtroglodyte:

feyosha:

feyosha:

Computers are very simple you see we take the hearts of dead stars and we flatten them into crystal chips and then we etch tiny pathways using concentrated light into the dead star crystal chips and if we etch the pathways just so we can trick the crystals into doing our thinking for us hope this clears things up.

How does it feel to be the most Galaxy Brained person in this entire thread

Well that certainly belongs on the post

notpoppunk:tomboypolemicist:I’m Christian and respect the order of creation as God intended it but…

notpoppunk:

tomboypolemicist:

I’m Christian and respect the order of creation as God intended it but I’m not gonna lie if I could take a massive vat of agar and grow an alive shopping mall made out of red blood and meat and feed it living human bodies to make it expand larger with more shops and amenities, Without hesitation, Without question I would do exactly that

i just feel at home on this website

Thinking about how my great-grandma had bound feet so by the 20th century, I guess, it was indeed a…

komsomolka:

What passes for feminine beauty tends to reflect the dominant class standards of society. […] In feudal China the mutilation by foot binding transformed upper-class women into class commodities, who would have neither the capacity nor the need to walk, because they were served by others. A luxury, by the way, that was not available to the peasant women, who worked in the fields. When you hear the phrase “Oh, Chinese women used to have their foot binded”, that’s not true, I mean, it’s a very small percentage in the landlord class who did. Chinese women who were breaking their backs in the fields never had that grotesque luxury. At the turn of the century pale skin […] was a sign of your class elevation. Women went out in parasol, they wore gloves, they wore broad rimmed hats. To be out in the sun was something you didn’t want to do. Who could afford not to be out in the sun? It was those people who didn’t work in the fields […]. That was a sign of upper class beauty. Later on being out in the sun became something of the playing traits of the rich and famous. They’re boating and they’re traveling and all this sort of thing. Suddenly, […] having a sun tan in the middle of December became the thing to have and people who used to not be out in the sun were now faking it themselves.

Michael Parenti, The Political Economy of Gender Oppression.

Thinking about how my great-grandma had bound feet so by the 20th century, I guess, it was indeed a “luxury” afforded by the lower classes.

lydia davis

snakesonacartesianplane:

apocryphics:

lydia davis

In the same vein:

“The simultaneous borrowing of French and Latin words led to a highly distinctive feature of modern English vocabulary: sets of three items, all expressing the same fundamental notion but differing slightly in meaning or style, e.g., kingly, royal, regal; rise, mount, ascend; ask, question, interrogate; fast, firm, secure; holy, sacred, consecrated. The Old English word (the first in each triplet) is the most colloquial, the French (the second) is more literary, and the Latin word (the last) more learned.” (Howard Jackson and Etienne Zé Amvela, “Words, Meaning and Vocabulary: An Introduction to Modern English Lexicology.” Continuum, 2000)

via ThoughtCo

Though I like how John McWhorter phrases it better:

But language tends not to do what we want it to. The die was cast: English had thousands of new words competing with native English words for the same things. One result was triplets allowing us to express ideas with varying degrees of formality. Help is English, aid is French, assist is Latin. Or, kingly is English, royal is French, regal is Latin – note how one imagines posture improving with each level: kingly sounds almost mocking, regal is straight-backed like a throne, royal is somewhere in the middle, a worthy but fallible monarch.

from “English is not normal”

This might be one of my favourite scenes of anything ever cause it’s so blindly obvious how…

dragons-in-spaceee:

This might be one of my favourite scenes of anything ever cause it’s so blindly obvious how connected they are after the drift!!!! The way they carry this speech – it doesn’t sound at all like two separate people with separate thoughts, this is ONE thought, ONE message and it is bouncing between them speaking so effortlessly. It’s so different to how they talk together earlier on in the film – they don’t cut each other off or argue or talk over each other, the sentences flow between the both of them like they’re one person. It’s honestly amazing to hear two people sound so incredibly connected