kikakattioi:

kingatticus:

jenroses:

explainingthejoke:

prehistoricsilverfish:

whomthegodswoulddestroy:

critical-perspective:

native-coronan:

triss19:

This is for all y’all who don’t understand how terrifying these suckers are. 

OHMYGOD IT’S ATTACKING THE STATUE OF LIBERTY SOMEBODY DO SOMETHING

I know just the man for the job.

This is a good joke. This is such a solid, quality joke.

@explainingthejoke ?

The initial image is a size comparison between the statue of liberty and a wind turbine. The wind turbine is over ninety feet (about 28 meters) taller.

A commenter pretended to misinterpret the image as one of a wind turbine attacking the statue of liberty. The next commenter answered with an image of Don Quixote, a literary character who once thought a windmill was a monster and announced his plans to fight it. They are joking that if a wind turbine attacked the statue of liberty, Don Quixote would be willing to fight the wind turbine.

Incidentally, that scene led to the English idiom “tilting at windmills,” meaning a person who has not only disproportionate reactions of anger, but disproportionate reactions of anger to nonexistent challenges.

So all those people who are fighting to preserve coal jobs and the fossil fuel economy are….

actually…

tilting at windmills.

I feel like this is one of the very few times where explaining the joke leads to another one that everyone can now understand and laugh at

This an amazing post

dimetrodone:

ajhasaplan:

dimetrodone:

 “Humanoid” can be a vague term when looking at alien/creature cause sometimes it refers to anything that’s upright and loosely has the body plan of a human, and other times people mean literally just a normal ass human with things added on

as long as it has a sensory organ or two and some limbs, it’s humanoid enough as far as I’m concerned.

Behold a man

the-spook-zone:

dreamofhircine:

dreamofhircine:

2018 is the year we all learn to make pacts with demons

in 2018 we let the seals slip away and grasp the clawed hand of the Abyss! reach into the void between worlds and pull out a friend! pact yourself, body and soul, to entities coursing with infernal energy!!

Reach into your local hellish rift and you will find a friend and boy

big-big-momma:

play-read-write:

I’ve been seeing some of those posts about humans being “space orcs” again. The ones where humans are just insane compared to other space faring species, and it reminded me of something i’d considered humans are also bad for that other species might consider insane: “Close enough.”

What if other space faring species only got there through like, extreme accuracy. Everything is tested and retested and tested some more. Problems are BIG DEAL on a ship no matter how minor because they just aren’t supposed to happen. Math is done down to like a hundred places after a decimal for accuracy. All species are therefore absolutely confounded at the human’s ability to just throw things together and have it work. Malfunctions are much more common on a human ship, but only on human ships are they accounted for. The others just don’t have problems unless they encounter something unexpected, but when they do get a problem they have no clue how to fix it. Humans on the other hand can have a hole blown in their ship and repair it asap because it’s expected. 

This extends to everything that gets built too. When an alien house gets destroyed by weather they determine that place uninhabitable, but when it happens to a human house they just rebuild in the exact same spot. Its confusing as hell because they prepare so much that something having so many problems is inconceivable, yet they also can’t figure out how things that fail so easily also work so well. What would take a complete overhaul from ten people of an alien race gets fixed with “duct tape and elbow grease” by a single human. 

So pretty much to them humans are always driving around with their check engine light on and they have no idea how this reckless species can survive space travel.

@space-australians

Anonymous:

in japanese they don’t say “the pot calling the kettle black” they say “mekuso hanakuso o warau” which literally translates as “an eye booger laughs at a nose booger” and i think that’s beautiful

when-in-doubt-sing:

postmodernmulticoloredcloak:

whatliesbeneaththefacade:

beautiful-basque-country:

livefromvietnam:

tawagalawas:

brasilian-bs:

langsandlit:

foxlanguages:

Hey, that’s actually quite funny. *Sigh* my desire to learn Japanese is increasing too much ^^

I had no idea this kind of expression/idiom existed in other languages! I only knew it in Neapolitan… ‘O ciuccio chiamma recchie longhe a ‘o cavallo which translates more or less literally to “the donkey calls the horse ‘long ears’”. I also have no idea if this exists in Italian..?

it’s a worldwide thing i guess

we say o sujo falando do mal lavado which is something like “the grimy talking shit about the filthy”

sujo means “dirty” and mal lavado means “badly-washed” but i took the liberty to translate like i did bc i like the “words” grimy and “filthy”

In Greek we say “Είπε ο γάιδαρος τον πετεινό κεφάλα”, which means “The donkey called the rooster big-headed” 🐓

In Vietnamese we use the phrase “chó chê mèo lắm lông” aka “The dog calls the cat hairy”

In Euskara we say “zozoak beleari: ipurbeltz!” that means “the blackbird [says] to the raven: black butt!”

In Spanish, “le dijo la sartén al cazo que estaba tiznado” aka “the frying pan told the pot it was sooty”.

Not sure what the idiom was in the formal Indonesian language, but in my local dialect (Manadonese Malay) it would be translated as “says the shrimp to the crab”

@langsandlit​ I didn’t know about the Neapolitan one! In standard Italian it’s “il bue dà del cornuto all’asino” i.e. the ox accuses the donkey to have horns (in Italian “having horns” means both actually having horns and that your spouse cheats on you, I figure the expression plays on that double meaning) but there are multiple regional variations with different animals and objects. I don’t know Milanese enough to know what’s the local expression here >.<

The traditional expression from the gospels about the splinter in another person’s eye and the log in your own eye is popular in Italy too, you can hear people say things like “eeh, pagliuzza e trave!” (splinter and log).

There’s also the pretty popular expression “da che pulpito…!” i.e. “from which pulpit (the sermon is coming from)” basically calling the person a priest that condemns behaviors he does himself :p

In French we say “l’hôpital qui se moque de la charité” which means “the hospital making fun of charity"and it´s way too pompous I like the donkey ones