littledivinity:

urrone:

queeniegalore:

derryderrydown:

ladyjanelly:

theminiummark:

madlori:

tzikeh:

thesaminal:

crazyassmurdererwall:

tarsdi:

we all have that movie we saw too young and probably scarred us for life.

RETURN TO OZ

The Secret of NIMH

The Shining. I was eight. Thanks, dad.

Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan. I was also eight. I had nightmares about those ear-worms for days. My mother has not forgiven the birthday-party-mom who took us to see it and it’s been thirty-five years. I’m over it (it’s one of my favorite movies now) but my mother…she will never be over it.

Babes from Toyland. I was five and still get a chill down my spine at the thought.

The Birds. I was five. 

Return to Oz and Dark Crystal are tied.

IT and Killer Klowns From Outer Space.

Hilariously, it was Princess Bride. I watched it when it first came out, I was probably five, and I thought it was a horror film. The ROUSes scared the living shit out of me, and the last thing I remember staying in the room for was Westley screaming as they sucked 50 years from him. I finally watched it again when I was 13 and LOVED it.

Fantasia. The wizard scared the crap out of me. I never rewatched it. I was 4. 

Either Candyman or Poltergeist 3.

Probably Poltergeist 3 really. When I was 6. With my mum.

iopele:

friendlytroll:

In the same vein as other ‘things humans do that aliens might be weirded out by’ what if human pattern recognition skills were the thing? Like the ability to see a cloud resolve into a dog, or faces in wall patterns. Stuff that evolved from predators having camouflaging abilities, or let’s face it, bugs that can look basicaly like a leaf to prey ON. 

Imagine an alien being super confounded by a human being like ‘oh, that control board looks like a face’ and it’s just this big grouping of random lights and line but no ALL the humans on board think it looks like a FACE and theyve started NAMING it. And it just seems so confusing- is there anything on this flat painted wall? ‘No of course not’ HOW IS THERE AN OF COURSE NOT. What about in that galaxy? And the human squints and stares at it and says ‘yeah, it looks like a cat.’

And they an draw out what they’re recognizing in the lines but it’s just so strange. 

And then an enemy develops ‘cloaking technology’ that’s based on camouflaging and are so angry that every single human is able to point it out because it’s a completely obvious moving shape to them. 

or: alien species are introduced to leaf insects, tigers, and that one octopus that imitates a coconut and freak the heck out.

god I love this kind of post

diversityinfilmtv:

Asian-American Actors Can No Longer Be Ignored. 

According to a recent New York Times article, more Asian-American actors and activists have spoken out with raw, unapologetic anger. 

When Constance Wu landed the part of Jessica Huang, the Chinese-American matriarch on the ABC sitcom “Fresh Off the Boat,” she didn’t realize just how significant the role would turn out to be. As she developed her part, Ms. Wu heard the same dismal fact repeated over and over again: It had been 20 years since a show featuring a predominantly Asian-American cast had aired on television. ABC’s previous offering, the 1994 Margaret Cho vehicle “All-American Girl,” was canceled after one season.

“I wasn’t really conscious of it until I booked the role,” Ms. Wu said. “I was focused on the task at hand, which was paying my rent.”

The show, which was just renewed for a third season, has granted Ms. Wu a steady job and a new perspective. “It changed me,” Ms. Wu said. After doing a lot of research, she shifted her focus “from self-interest to Asian-American interests.”

Other actors lending their voices include Kumail Nanjiani of “Silicon Valley,” Ming-Na Wen of “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and Aziz Ansari, who in his show, “Master of None,” plays an Indian-American actor trying to make his mark.

They join longtime actors and activists like BD Wong of “Gotham”; Margaret Cho, who has taken her tart comedic commentary to Twitter; andGeorge Takei, who has leveraged his “Star Trek” fame into a social media juggernaut.

“There’s an age-old stereotypical notion that Asian-American people don’t speak up,” Mr. Wong said. But “we’re really getting into people’s faces about it.”

Read more of this article on nytimes.com.